Tag Archives: faith

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Listening to Your Lonely

Written by Melanie Rogers, MMFT, LPC-MHSP When asked what makes loneliness hard to admit, people of all ages often say that they believe loneliness means they are messed up, defective, a loser, friendless, or unlovable. This condemning voice that calls us names is what Dr. Chip Dodd calls the voice of toxic shame in his book, The Voice of the Heart. Rather than lead us to acknowledge our neediness, toxic shame entangles our hearts, tightly binding them up, leaving us unable to experience full life because we can’t experience our natural place. We believe we should hide who we are, and we center our lives

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New Beginnings

By Beth Gillem With fall quickly approaching, it seems that the mad rush to do all the “lasts” of summer begins and the "to do” lists for the start of fall rapidly grow. It happens every year. There is an implied ending and beginning that happens in September. People ask, “Have you had a good summer?” or, “Are you ready for fall?” There is something about a fresh start—a new school year, new backpacks, and new notebooks—that brings a nervous, excited energy with it. In You’ve Got Mail, Joe Fox attempts to woo Kathleen Kelly with a line that I believe

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Wrestling with Hope

Written by Stephen James, MMFT, LPC-MHSP and Tennyson Dodd, MTS  Sage Hill Counseling has a latin phrase as its motto; Dum Spiro Spero. Translated it means, “While there is breath, there is hope.” When people first encounter this they often comment about how positive it makes them feel. Many imagine hope to be a profound feeling that things will work out for the best. When we really consider this phrase in connection to our everyday life, however, we run into something much deeper. For many of us, Hope is the biggest problem in our lives, not pain. The future is where the

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Seeking the Spiritual

People have been seeking out spiritual guides for nearly as long as the Christian faith has existed. In the early 3rd century, seekers would travel to the desert to find mystics that lived there and ask for spiritual guidance. These mystics, or Desert Fathers and Mothers, practiced listening for and to God in the silence and solitude of the desert—away from societal pressures where life was harsh and vulnerable, yet simple and pious. Seekers would make the pilgrimage to a mystic community, stand at the outer gate and ask, “Please, a word for my soul.” The seeker, likely not all that different from us, was looking for answers to their

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