The Current

Helping you navigate through life

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Surviving Back to School Chaos

"Mom, I am so sad." On the way home from tax-free weekend shopping, my son, gazing out the window as we passed his old middle school, said, "Oh Mom, I’m so sad. I will miss my old middle school." In that moment, I realized that I was sad too. His voice... his heart... pierced the armor of anxiety I had put on in order to try and just get my kids back to school. (He) pierced the armor of anxiety I had put on in order to try and just get my kids back to school. My son has autism.

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The Gift of Our Imagination

Have you ever thought to yourself, “If I could just know the future, then everything would be ok.” This kind of magical thinking troubles a lot of us. It’s called anxiety, and thoughts like this carry the potential for a lot of wasted energy. Anxiety is a powerful self-willed illusion that says, “If I can outsmart life and predict the future, then I will be ok.” When we are in anxiety, we work over a problem until our brain is like a hamster on speed in a wheel—a whole lot of running with nowhere to go. What could go wrong? How many different ways? What will he say? What will she

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To Change

For the majority of my life, I’ve felt drawn to change. Not the dye-my-hair-every-season type of change, but a voracious hunger for new surroundings, new roles to explore, new relationships to replace old. I moved across the city, the country, the world; I changed majors, I changed career paths; I tried new hobbies, I entered new communities. I considered it courageous—to be able to let go of familiar and explore new. Looking back, I realize I often sought a change in avoidance of my need to change. My journey was toward a place to belong. When asked, “Where’s home?” I’d

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Your Heart is Your Home

Imagine making your home at the office, waking up in the morning on a couch in the place you do business, where you greet other people who awaken where they work and live too. You go to the restroom down the hall to rinse your face and use the stall to relieve yourself. You return to the break room, make coffee. Then, back to the office to read your one-minute motivational material from a pocket-sized book of promises, while eating yogurt, fruit, and granola in the room where you slept.  Afterwards, you move on to standing and stretching to maintain

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What You Need to Know About Trauma

Several years ago, I sat at my kitchen table making a simple grocery list. In the middle of making the list, my mind went blank and I broke into tears. “What is wrong with me?” I thought. I had no “real” reason to be upset. I had a beautiful family, great friends, and good health. I felt guilty for even “allowing” myself to feel this way. However, as I began thinking through the previous year, I remembered all that had happened. Four family members passed away, job loss, financial difficulty, and moving to a new town, all while clumsily attempting

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Feelings are Inevitable

Years ago I wrote a book titled The Voice of the Heart: A Call to Full Living. It is about feelings and living how we are created to live. That was almost twenty years ago. I have continued to work in the field of “living life on life’s terms” and continue to experience the struggles and joys of life on life’s terms daily. I have also continued to discover how true it is that we are made for relationship—with our own hearts, the hearts of others, and the heart of God. We cannot live life fully unless we are living

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Loneliness: the Root of all Good

The world does not always let us in on the good of loneliness. It seems that almost everything under the sun is created to keep us distracted from catching this dreadful disease. What if this disease that we work tirelessly to avoid led us back into the good of everything that we once believed in? It seems that almost everything under the sun is created to keep us distracted from catching this dreadful disease. Unfortunately many people that come in and out of my office have built up a hatred to what were once organic cries of their heart. Why

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Fear and the Unknown

We do not truly fear the unknown. In reality, we fear a recurrence of painful events we have already experienced, seen, or know have happened to someone else. This fear of recurrence is experiential and understandable. Nevertheless, it can trap us in a cycle. The cycle can take us away from the future we actually want. Our defenses can trap us in the past by coloring our futures with the pains of our pasts. We do not truly fear the unknown; we fear a recurrence of painful events we have already experienced.     Once wounded and not healed, we watch out

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Hurt People Hurt People

When people get hurt in relationship and do not receive healing from the wounds, they have a logical and defensible tendency to become protective against more pain. A wound that does not receive attention remains sensitive; a person becomes wary of being relationally “cut” again. The younger one is when unattended hurt begins, the more wary they become of a potential recurrence. The wariness that becomes defensiveness becomes common sense to the wounded person—even logical and defensible. But just because it is understandable does not make the consequences to others justifiable.     The defense that protects can eventually become the defense

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I’m Sorry

What do you say when you don’t know what to say? What can be said that helps when you are presented with another person’s loss, pain, grief, and struggle? When we are presented with pain over which we are powerless to repair, the words that truly fit the circumstance are, “I’m sorry.”  We can offer a person our sorrow, the identifying pain that says, “I deeply wish that this struggle were not yours, and I offer you my care.” "I'm sorry" can be the words that hold a person’s heart for a moment.     We do not usually believe the words,

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